The Rise and Fall of Empire - x1 S Smart
The Rise and Fall of Empire - x2 S Smart
The Rise and Fall of Empire - x3 S Smart

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The Inspiration behind the design:

The Rise and Fall of Empire

Napoleon Bonapart is

the inspiration behind

this piece.

napoleon to josephine on her pregnancy.j
napoleons letter of surrender.jpg
8543b34361d7ef31644a76072f42d07e.jpg
Gros-Napoleon-Bonaparte-First-Consul-180

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And on one sleeve, is traced the wording of the surrender letter Napoleon wrote to The Prince Regent in 1815. Both were done using red transfer paper.

On one pocket is the tracing of a letter Napoleon wrote to Josephine on learning of her pregnancy, which turned out not to be real.

Whilst the French army wore blue Napoleon can be seen wearing red in several paintings of him at rest or in positions of state. This is: Napoleon as First Consul, by Antoine-Jean Gros, 1802

 

This is Major General Destaing's habit from 1798. In use between 1798 and 1803.

This dress of Destaing is very close to the dress of Bonaparte worn at the battle of Marengo.

The third reason that this frockcoat is red as well as the primary inspiration for the surface decoration of The Rise and Fall of Empire was: Napoleon's Cloak (Burnous) 1797 - 1805 (Felt, silk, silk brocade, silver thread, braid, tinsel. It is owned today by The Royal Collection Trust, please click this button to view it on their site:

Blood: "Concerning the French losses due to the Napoleonic wars, I know that historians are the first to say that they are very difficult to evaluate. I read somewhere that the Fondation Napoléon estimated the losses at between 400,000 and 1 million dead, with a reasonable estimate of 700,000 dead."

- written by Thibault de NOBLET, Adjoint de conservatio, Département Moderne, Musée de l’Armée